BIO & EPK

Select from a short, mid and long bio below.  You’ll also find links to downloadable performance photos as well as logos. I’ve also included a link to request access to the latest release for media outlets.

SHORTY SHORT BIO

Linda 'shibes' Schaible

Linda ‘shibes’ Schaible is a Texas-based singer-songwriter and Americana artist with a has a passion for songwriting, who took the long road to her first solo record.

Part of the British Cooper family musical legacy which began in the 1800’s, Linda continues an unbroken lineage of performance, first in the successful Folk/Americana duo Amelia Earhart Returns, and now as a solo performer on her debut record Seco Sessions.

As a published poet, Schaible brings the lessons learned from poet Arthur Smith to her songwriting.  Her songs are known for the imagery and poetic language that fill the lines, creating characters and moments that reflect what many of us encounter as we love, live, endure, evolve and celebrate our lives.

Her debut solo release, Seco Sessions, is no exception.  The project symbolizes the cathartic change that can occur when one step is taken toward a destination.  With one decision, she shifted the course of her songwriting and celebrates that evolution with an album capturing the comradery, trust, friendship and supportive songwriting spirit of a very special songwriting retreat in Arroyo Seco NM.

A LITTLE MORE BIO

Texas-based singer-songwriter and Americana artist Linda ‘shibes’ Schaible has a passion for songwriting, but took the long road to her first solo record.  You might say her journey began back in 1849, when her 3X great-grandfather William Cooper founded the Huthwaite Prize Band in a small village in England.

Part of the Cooper musical legacy, Linda continues an unbroken lineage of performance, including her mother’s own career in Ivy Benson’s all women’s orchestra in the 50’s.

In the 90’s Linda was part of the successful Folk/Americana duo Amelia Earhart Returns, playing to audiences across Tennessee and the Carolinas with lead guitarist and vocalist Kristen Hart.  Their record Testimony could be heard on radio stations like WIMZ and Rock 104 in Knoxville TN and WNCW in Spindale NC.  It brought together the haunting tones of Hart’s passion for the blues and Shibes’ love of lyric-focused songwriters like John Gorka, Nanci Griffith, Cliff Eberhardt and Eric Andersen.

As a published poet, Schaible brings the lessons learned from poet Arthur Smith to her songwriting. Her songs are known for the imagery and poetic language that fill the lines, creating characters and moments that reflect what many of us encounter as we love, live, endure, evolve and celebrate our lives.

Her debut solo release, Seco Sessions, is no exception.  The project symbolizes the cathartic change that occurs when one step is taken toward a destination.  With one decision, she shifted the course of her songwriting.

Seco Sessions is her story of transformation and song craft evolution.  “I was at a crossroads with my songwriting.  I had been pursuing writing and pitching to others, and then realized my songs weren’t my songs.  They were about things that didn’t really help me understand much about myself or my place here.  I took a step back and made a single decision that changed everything for me.  I sent an email to BMI Songwriter of The Year Susan Gibson and asked for her help.  That decision started a chain reaction and got me here.”

Seco Sessions is a collection of songs that tie to a songwriting retreat recommended by long-time friend and award-winning songwriter Louise Mosrie.  The retreat, held by some of the best songwriters and musicians in the American genre: Eliza Gilkyson, John Gorka, Don Richmond and Cisco Ryder, took place in Arroyo Seco New Mexico.

The experience evoked some of Linda’s most personal, best-written songs including “What I’ll Be” that began as a riff in a corner of the courtyard and a casual “you should write something to that” push from a teenager.  The more ethereal “Strange Science” evolved from a two verse start both Linda and Eliza agreed wasn’t very interesting into a song that unravels the mystery of lost love using science and weather metaphors that bring the emotion to ground.

The imagery-intense “22 Hours (II)” found it’s groove with the help of Cisco Ryder when sitting in an adobe garage studio recording for the first time after performing it nervously in front of John Gorka on the retreat’s opening day, the songs on the record all have their genesis in Arroyo Seco.

“When I look back, music has been one of my biggest joys, from sitting in the basement of the Laurel Theater with Gillian Welch & David Rawlings talking about songwriting to sharing the stage as Amelia Earhart Returns with folks like Caroline Aiken, Norman & Nancy Blake, The Nields, Disappear Fear, Guy & Evan Carawan, Tim & Molly O’Brien, Stacey Earle & Mark Stuart, Mindy Smith and Louise Mosrie.  I’m glad I found my way back.”

ALL THE DETAILS BIO

What do you get when you combine a British musician and an Air Force bomb disposal chief (EOD)?  A very focused musician who doesn’t get rattled too much and is willing to take a chance on something out of the ordinary.

Texas-based singer-songwriter and Americana artist Linda ‘shibes’ Schaible has a passion for songwriting, but took the long road to her first solo record.  You might say her journey began back in 1849, when her 3X great-grandfather William Cooper founded the Huthwaite Prize Band in a small village in England.

Part of the Cooper musical legacy, Linda continues an unbroken lineage of performance, including her mother’s own career in Ivy Benson’s all women’s orchestra in the 50’s.

In the 90’s Linda was part of the successful Folk/Americana duo Amelia Earhart Returns, playing to audiences across Tennessee and the Carolinas with lead guitarist and vocalist Kristen Hart.  Their record Testimony could be heard on radio stations like WIMZ and Rock 104 in Knoxville TN and WNCW in Spindale NC.  It brought together the haunting tones of Hart’s passion for the blues and Shibes’ love of lyric-focused songwriters like John Gorka, Nanci Griffith, Cliff Eberhardt and Eric Andersen.

As a published poet, Schaible brings the lessons learned from poet Arthur Smith to her songwriting.  Her songs are known for the imagery and poetic language that fill the lines, creating characters and moments that reflect what many of us encounter as we love, live, endure, evolve and celebrate our lives.

Her debut solo release, Seco Sessions, is no exception.  The project symbolizes the cathartic change that occurs when one step is taken toward a destination.  With one decision, she shifted the course of her songwriting.

Seco Sessions is her story of transformation and song craft evolution.  “I was at a crossroads with my songwriting.  I had been pursuing writing and pitching to others, and then realized my songs weren’t my songs.  They were about things that didn’t really help me understand much about myself or my place here.  So I stopped.  I took a step back and made a single decision that changed everything for me.  I sent an email to BMI Songwriter of The Year Susan Gibson and asked for her help.  That decision started a chain reaction and got me here.”

Seco Sessions is a time capsule of sorts.  It’s a collection of songs that tie to a songwriting retreat recommended by long-time friend and award-winning songwriter Louise Mosrie.  “It was simple enough.  I told her what was going on, about connecting with Susan, and that I was looking for a new tribe.  She said, ‘hey, you like John Gorka, and you like New Mexico.  You know he’s doing a songwriting retreat with Eliza Gilkyson in Arroyo Seco.  You should go.’  And that was that.  I was in!  Life’s funny in the way it unfolds.  I signed up and it changed my life – I know that sounds corny, but it changed everything: how I see myself as a songwriter, and my confidence level as a performer.”

From songs like “What I’ll Be” that began as a riff in a corner of the courtyard and a casual “you should write something to that” push from a teenager; to the more ethereal “Strange Science” that evolved from something Eliza and Linda agreed wasn’t very interesting to a song that unravels the mystery of lost love using science and weather metaphors that bring the emotion to ground; to sitting in an adobe garage studio recording “22 Hours (II)” for the first time after performing it nervously in front of John Gorka on the retreat’s opening day, the songs on the record all have their genesis in Arroyo Seco.

“For a good number of years, the music stopped for me.  You get caught up in pursuing things like career and professional status, and your passions get shoved into a corner.  When I look back, music has been one of my biggest joys, from sitting in the basement of the Laurel Theater with Gillian Welch & David Rawlings talking about songwriting to sharing the stage as Amelia Earhart Returns with folks like Caroline Aiken, Norman & Nancy Blake, The Nields, Disappear Fear, Guy & Evan Carawan, Tim & Molly O’Brien, Stacey Earle & Mark Stuart, Mindy Smith and Louise Mosrie.  I’m glad I found my way back.”

Much like the multi-instrumentalists in her family, Linda ‘shibes’ Schaible is an accomplished musician in her own right.  She plays guitar, bass, mandolin, saxophone, trombone and trumpet – the brass a nod to her English musical roots.

Perhaps teaching is something that also comes down from her ancestors.  She has always shared her passion for songwriting with others, particularly those learning to write songs for the first time.

She’s taught summer youth workshops at the University of Tennessee, starting a free web site for aspiring songwriters called SongChops.com in 2009, and is a coordinator for the NSAI Chapter in Houston Texas.  In addition to writing songs, she is a published poet and has been honored as a recipient of the Bain-Swiggett Poetry Prize for forms.

Why ‘shibes’?  Because Schaible is awful hard to say!  The nickname came out of a company town hall meeting.  When Linda was introduced by long-time friend and President John O’Loughlin.  Not even he could say her last name right.  Schaible, pronounced Shy-blee, never actually came out.  After stumbling on the pronunciation, he said – just call her “shibes”!

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Seco Sessions Poster 2FEB 2019

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